ingredients magazine
lamb recipes
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roast lamb at 350 degrees
slicing roasted lamb

Lamb is too often a gamey meat that many have tried once at a banquet with mint jelly. Like with many ingredients, a person’s first experience with lamb sets a precedent. We are here to encourage you to give lamb another chance and to help you prepare lamb correctly.

As in the photo above, a lamb roast was probably your first introduction to lamb. It’s too easy to receive an overcooked piece of lamb at a restaurant, particularly in buffets. The pleasant flavor of lamb is easily ruined by over-cooking because fats and juices that are lost in the roasting process are essential to that pleasant flavor.

Some cuts of lamb, such as the shank, do require cooking periods of up to 8 hours; however these cuts are simmered in a prepared broth until the meat almost falls off the bone.

For a simple roast like in the above photo, first salt the lamb and completely coat with good quality oil in which fresh herbs have been soaking. Roast lamb uncovered at 400 degrees for 20 minutes, then reduce heat to 350. Cook until center is at 145 degrees and let rest for 20 minutes before carving. Avoid using mint jelly.

Ground lamb is good for many things, from tasty burgers to unique foreign dishes, lamb is healthy and flavorful. Ground lamb mixes well with spices, and handles in much the same ways you’re familiar with using ground beef.

In the next pages, we present to you recipes that use chops, lollipops, shanks and ground lamb.
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ingredients magazine